Sonnet: (template) (Haiku/terza-rima/tanka) Coming (perhaps) soon to a website near you

This pattern occurred to me several days prior. I have experimented with sonnets containing word-wise or word count haiku in one form or another. And have made some notes regarding some that I might soon attempt.

I have never, on the other hand, written a sonnet in terza-rima which at that time a few days ago, also struck me as an ideal rhymescheme for embedded haiku. But even more recently, yesterday evening on my way home from running a few errands, it suddenly made some sense to me that if I concluded the sonnet with an embedded tanka, I would not need to include a 15th line or include an extra line representing a rather long title (in iambic pentameter.) In this way, I believe I might combine these two oriental forms with sonnet form seamlessly.

Furthermore, having considered the fusion of the two and/or three forms at some length, I have devised five differing rhymeschemes as shown in the diagram below:

 
line     words      Rhymescheme: 1  2  3  4  5
-----------------------------------------------
 1)        5                     A  A  A  A  A
 2)        7                     B  B  B  B  B
 3)        5                     A  A  A  C  A

 4)        5                     B  B  A  A  C
 5)        7                     C  A  B  C  B
 6)        5                     B  C  C  D  C

 7)        5                     C  A  C  B  D
 8)        7                     D  C  D  C  E
 9)        5                     C  D  C  D  D

10)        5                     D  C  C  B  F
11)        7                     E  D  D  D  E
12)        5                     D  E  E  E  F

13)      5 [7]                   E  D  F  E  G
14)      7 [x]                  [D] E [D] D [F]
15)      5 [7]                   E [D] F [E] G
------------------------------------------------
.

In all cases, I believe line 14 (the one with the ‘x’) would be omitted in favour of the tanka termination. This would give a 7 word concluding couplet rhyme to end each piece regardless of which of the five rhymeschemes I might use.

I therefore am getting a bit closer to writing something specifically for Kanzensakura–something I would very much like to do.

Permalink

Advertisements

Sonnet II: Once More for Sam

He sung of Sisters close and sweet, and taught;
Of sea, and wealth, he droned a mournful view.
Of Death himself, as fine as Death, he brought
A smile to my lips when fear they knew.

And lovely, to a barren cheek he drew,
The very first and only tear, he claimed.
Of no return, that no man ever knew;
So quick and fleet an image, thus he named:

“In Xanadu…” he dreamt a man beyond;
A man, within that Sunny Dome, was he.
Who dwelt in Paradise that dream had spawned;
I know, his home, he must have lived to see.

For I, enticed by Crystal Caves of Ice;
By Honey Dew, have drunk of Paradise.

Sonnet XIII: Falling

Extraordinary blooms, ye mustn’t fall,
Although bereft of you I plaintive sing;
Complete, your gifted dedication all–

For nothing–your renunciation; bring…
To me, my restlessness, one restful gift,
Another consequential tear, one ring…

Of truthful blossoming, cascading swift,
Of falling and of blowing, gently brave;
Traversing mountains, even oceans, lift–

Beyond torrential, gentle blossoms gave;
Beyond such starfields, drop and bloom perfect;
Away… beyond temporal counting, save…
Our loneliness, do each to us affect;
As petal-drops, alone, our days reflect.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

Permalink

Sonnet I: The Beat of the Drum

I’ll answer every call, Though I know I
Might die quickly; yet answer will I still.
While knowing I could fall, and although I
Might be sickly; yet answer them I will.

Even if I am alone, I’ll answer
With conviction; nor even hesitate.
‘Til our tyrants’ overthrown, no plans or
Dereliction, will keep me from their gate.

If we are in chains, and none are free, for
Life is empty, I’ll even fight my kin.
Doubtless, ’til remains, upon the sea or
Land, of them, we have scattered to the wind.

Free, is this, my land; joined, but not by chains;
‘Til no man can stand; ’til no man remains.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

Permalink

Sonnet III: Where I Rest

So quiet thou beside me; so austere
Dost thou confide thee, silently to sleep.
Angelic thou, delightful; though as clear
Dost thou alight believe thou safe to keep…

Thee well protected, do I; and so sweet
Thy dreaming true; mine angel wouldst appear.
And though thou art about me; so discrete
And so devoutly, shall I hold thee near…

And dearly do I wrap thee, my surround
I would enrapt, be to mine own replete.
Delight at once to hold thee and abound
That once untold, rejoice for thee complete…

And wound about thee tightly; and so deep,
Profound, and knightly… love thee; yet I weep….

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

Permalink

Sonnet VI: Violets

‘Til noon, before these Violets lovely stir
With bloom that splendour morning’s promised awe;
Too soon, I made my contract, drunk on her
Perfume, and swore this compact as my law;

And strewn for all, to savour all the more,
Presume this Moonlight-sweet enthralment were
Immune to circumstance; that here, before
The gloom,  ill-fortune shan’t to these occur.

From Moon unto Aspasia, then, I go,
Subsumed by Columbine ’til Dawn’s deplore,
Marooned and Wild; to Corsican I know,
Entombed this fivefold Covenant I swore;

And prune such flaws, assuming naught will show;
Festooned and drawn: my doom from long ago.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

Sonnet: Humility

Wherefore hath gone Humility, this Gift
That God hath given thee, that thou wouldst cast
So easily aside? Away so fast
His pearl hath been asunder set adrift

Therein; from thee this place so deep and vast
Must hide.  So precious, thou hast thrown so swift
Away His all-forgiving Shrift, ‘twould lift
Ye all together and astride.  Thou hast

His Spirit sore forsook, Thyatrian,
His word mistook, His boundless grace undone
And misapplied.  Who then art thou who tried
His Grace–Galatian, His Gifts replace–
When to and through the law His Son hath died?
Yet still shall He forgive and thee embrace!

Permalink