Part V of the…

…slowly unfolding female series, is rather an interesting one technically.  Composed, including its title, of word-count based haiku, which, as I have discovered lately can be written in iambic pentameter.  10 syllables per line, with 5 iambic feet, which consist of a feminine (unaccented) syllable followed by a masculine (accented.)  I do love additional constraints, they almost always make for an interesting sound, even if clarity is an even greater challenge. Continue reading

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The sonnets are coming! The sonnets are coming!!!

I confess I have been a bit under the weather, however, this is not the only reason I am a bit late in posting.

I have discovered a few things about the nature of this kind of work:

First, I believe one objective was not entirely well thought out. Writing a sonnet every day, is something that can be accomplished in less than seven days. For that reason, I believe the weekend was created (perhaps by God?) In any case, working seven days a week is a recipe for ultimate disaster. I had the notion a few weeks ago, to write ahead, so that I could take the weekend–much like a normal working fellow, regardless of the freelance nature of my chosen profession.  Which, alas, must be (except for kisses) its own reward. Continue reading

Haiku introductions are…

…interesting and fun to write. Particularly sequences. However, a month or two ago, I rediscovered, by way of another poetry blogger, the non syllabic form of haiku. This using 5 – 7 – 5 word count, rather than counting syllables. I have been favourably disposed to doing those, however of late have discovered yet another way to meld my love for sonnets with my interest in Haiku. Continue reading

I thought up another: form of rhymescheme notation, and alternate of sonnet form….

The following is paraphrased as well as copy/pasted from the entry in question–see the link below for the original (which, by this time, may well have been lucased)

I came upon an old, unpolished work of mine. Not exactly in this form, but in tetrameter Originally there were 4 quatrains. The original rhymescheme was AAxA, BBxB, etc. where ‘x’ is non rhyming. I thought one could sonnetize that by Turning the non-rhyming ‘x’ into a rhyme that carries through. This was an interesting result:

At last, the dawn, in perfect form, I see
So formed, a positive reality.
It’s purple state, in perfect choir, unveil
To shine, inspiringly, its song on me.

With form, and measure never void, it brings
A subtle mastery of the world it sings.
Without abash, I hear it tell a tale
Of majesty, and many more such things

Which burn with glory’s power, as they shine
Upon this shadow dappled world of mine.
My dreams are splendour, as they dance–prevail
With measure, and with form, and perfect line!

And dance I shall, as light–as mirrors bright
Reflect–avail, ’til dark, ’til death, ’til night!

Once again, you see the compressed rhyme scheme in the ending couplet.  I may post the original at some point; and I may post the altered sixteen line version, which is in iambic pentameter.

Also, on that note, I am beginning to think that, in order to more clearly describe rhymeschemes, one might perhaps use letters and numbers, or perhaps, upper and lower case letters, for different types of rhymes. And perhaps, ‘x’ might indicate lines that do not rhyme?

As an example, to describe the above, one could do the following:

AA1A, BB1B, etc. Or perhaps 11A1, 22A2, etc. Thus, one draws a distinction between the two types of rhymes–-as “ephemeral,” or immortal, or perhaps even better called, “perpetual.”

As such, one can clearly see delineated such rhymes which only last a short time, with those which carry through an entire piece, or, as may be the case, a larger part of a much larger piece.

It makes more sense to me when I look at it. What one usually sees would be AABA, CCBA, etc, but where “A” feels like a “first rhyme” “C” really feels like a “second” (or a B) but, in this kind of numbering, “C” generally means “3″ which makes the notation confusing, and one has to think about it a bit more, to decipher.

And as I think of it more, I think the appropriate version of the above would be:

AA1A, BB1B, etc.

This is because, while it is highly unlikely that there would be a large number of ephemeral rhymes, or at least those for which the alphabet could not be recycled, there could potentially be–in a very long piece–any number of perpetual rhymes.  And using the lowercase ‘x’ makes sense for non rhyming lines as well.

And a compressed scheme (or lines with internal rhymes such as the final couplet here could be in brackets of some kind.  For this, I have generally been using square brackets. This would give the above sonnet as:

AA1A,  BB1B,  CC1C,  [DD][1D]

via Sonnet: | David Emeron: Sonnets.

I have taken to linking sonnets from throughout the site…

…on these two companion blogs. Both “Reflections” and “Sonnet Blog” will now contain these, particularly when there are no posts for the day. At times, I will no doubt be lazy and simply reblog them, at others I will include formatted versions. Most the the latter will occur, I should think.

Sonnet VI: Exalted

In aire, dost–poise thou in His image–fly
Perfection! bronzed against Hyperion’s blaze;
Exalted! at thy nadir by His rays;
With mastery! dost thou hold thy piece of sky.

In aire, for thee, hath stopt all time; on high,
At perfect flexion, as His Son displayed:
Retract, and tense, ’til once thou deign obeyed
His gravity, that deign thou not defy.

Down! by His unseen force, to Earth art thrown;
Descend thou! as I gasp–thy devotee.
Thou! slicing air! perfection still outshone!
And twist! and roll! and turn! to all degree!
As fly thou through devoted hands alone
With thee, who hast so Godly kist the sea.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet IV: Lies

Say not thou knew the nature of a man,
Whilst knowing not the nature of thy thought.
Dost not thou know such thought is of a plan
Which not thine own, should one day be untaught?

Though thou art vaccinated well against
The recognition of such ill intent,
Thine own cognition likewise is dispensed
Away from that such thoughts misrepresent.

But who then are thy lords, that shan’t thou see
Such twisting evil as through thee hath spun?
What are such words, as should so guarantee
That never shall such evil be undone:

Such lies, as evil men have told to thee;
Such damage, as their serpent’s words decree.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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