Sonnet XII: How Am I Kept

When doth she strive to him in comfort keep;
And strive, withal, her heart, and sweet, her hands;
To soft his dreams, so gentle on their way,
His thoughts to soothe and calm his restive mind,

That quick across the vasty star-fields leap;
So never may alight the shifting sands
‘Pon any mote to pause that might delay,
Of all his thought, its whirling dance combined.

For, never doth requite his mind in sleep;
Not even as the God of sleep demmands’.
To wake him, doth she hear temptation say;
Yet I’m, to her illusion, not inclined….

Desire, thou bent all deep toward what commands’
My peace; for next the day, this night would find!

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Sonnet XI: Her Peace

So dreameth now my love again in sleep
And smileth angelic, she; though dream
Not angels, as His children may create;
As we alone were from His image made.

And deep, she doth within, such wonder keep;
Such visions, perfect in her care, doth seem.
My love so doth me gift, in perfect state,
This firmament some deity forbade;

Wherefrom I am forbidden still to leap
And soar and glide, so bright above, supreme,
So realised, hath she made, though inchoate,
Where she, these gardens of delight, hath played.

But still I weep, that safety, my esteem
May not create, when demons there invade.

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sonnet X: As Thou Hast Seen

Of mee, thy love, hast thou such wonders seen,
Though many true, hast not thou seen these all;
Hast not, my dance as stole thy breath away,
So long before and far removed from thine.

Imagine thou what doth breathtaking mean,
If watch me dance thou wouldst as watch me fall.
And long before, this beauty I convey,
So lovely, this I played, who’s bow were mine.

And this, by thee unheard, and thee unseen,
Hath made the harsh to weep, the weak to pall.
Yet heard, hast thou, my song most every day;
And seen thou, throngs, as water turned to wine….

And yet, thy mien my love, could angels thrall;
One day, in Heaven, show me these divine.

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Sonnet VIII: Shadowlands

My love, to shadowlands, again thou dost
Return; I may not see, I may not know
These lands wherein thou wanderest; what light
Enchanted dost thou follow through the mist.

Though taken fancy hence where fancy must,
I may not follow thee where thou, below
Might sink beneath; nor even take to flight,
Nor feel what sky thou touched, nor what thou kist.

Nor may perceive, but that they turn to dust,
Such shadowed forms, where shadowdust may blow;
Nor climb where hast thou flown; whatever height
To know of what these shadowlands consist.

Yet trust my love to find where doth she goe
In dark her night; whereto her path may twist.

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Sonnet VI: If I Should Sleep

Perchance I slumber, whilst she watcheth mee;
So deeply do I sleep; nor chance to wake.
Though doth, to touch, she lovingly adore?
Oblivious, I still yet slumber on.

How now, to look upon me whole, doth she?
I sleep; so warm a breath the night wouldst make.
Doth she, my contours, lovingly explore?
So doth my rest, so shan’t I stir thereon.

And doth my love withal abound such glee,
Caresses deeply striven, then partake?
Though all, should I desire to wake, the more,
I barely stir; though should I, whereupon.

But see! my love but breathe my name; forsake
Mine oft adoréd sleep, do I, anon.

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Sonnet V: All About Me

Again, doth stir in pretty slumber so,
But slight, her waking; dreameth then of he
Whose bearing and whose presence seemed unique.
And he, of small advantage, seemed as wise;

Yet hardly did aware, he seem, nor know;
Was more, that either view, than blind decree.
About him still, so more than just mystique;
Yet not conceit, as others she’d surmise.

And of his expertise, might nothing show;
Unless such confidence she chanced to see.
And might she little know of such technique,
Unless through conversation might surprise.

Though not precisely modest, I’d agree,
My love wouldst speak my greatness (most unwise!)

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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