Sonnet: (template) (Haiku/terza-rima/tanka) Coming (perhaps) soon to a website near you

This pattern occurred to me several days prior. I have experimented with sonnets containing word-wise or word count haiku in one form or another. And have made some notes regarding some that I might soon attempt.

I have never, on the other hand, written a sonnet in terza-rima which at that time a few days ago, also struck me as an ideal rhymescheme for embedded haiku. But even more recently, yesterday evening on my way home from running a few errands, it suddenly made some sense to me that if I concluded the sonnet with an embedded tanka, I would not need to include a 15th line or include an extra line representing a rather long title (in iambic pentameter.) In this way, I believe I might combine these two oriental forms with sonnet form seamlessly.

Furthermore, having considered the fusion of the two and/or three forms at some length, I have devised five differing rhymeschemes as shown in the diagram below:

 
line     words      Rhymescheme: 1  2  3  4  5
-----------------------------------------------
 1)        5                     A  A  A  A  A
 2)        7                     B  B  B  B  B
 3)        5                     A  A  A  C  A

 4)        5                     B  B  A  A  C
 5)        7                     C  A  B  C  B
 6)        5                     B  C  C  D  C

 7)        5                     C  A  C  B  D
 8)        7                     D  C  D  C  E
 9)        5                     C  D  C  D  D

10)        5                     D  C  C  B  F
11)        7                     E  D  D  D  E
12)        5                     D  E  E  E  F

13)      5 [7]                   E  D  F  E  G
14)      7 [x]                  [D] E [D] D [F]
15)      5 [7]                   E [D] F [E] G
------------------------------------------------
.

In all cases, I believe line 14 (the one with the ‘x’) would be omitted in favour of the tanka termination. This would give a 7 word concluding couplet rhyme to end each piece regardless of which of the five rhymeschemes I might use.

I therefore am getting a bit closer to writing something specifically for Kanzensakura–something I would very much like to do.

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Part XII: (lyrical couplets)

This, the most familiar form of rhyme
Is used in song and verse time after time

This the sixth edition came about
The gateway to familiarise throughout
Continue reading

Part 11: (Shakespearean blankverse)

Divinely “stepping rhythm:” blankverse–thou,
Most courtly poetess, to me once wrote–
To promenade as flawlessly anon.
Continue reading

Sonnet XIII: Falling

Extraordinary blooms, ye mustn’t fall,
Although bereft of you I plaintive sing;
Complete, your gifted dedication all–

For nothing–your renunciation; bring…
To me, my restlessness, one restful gift,
Another consequential tear, one ring…

Of truthful blossoming, cascading swift,
Of falling and of blowing, gently brave;
Traversing mountains, even oceans, lift–

Beyond torrential, gentle blossoms gave;
Beyond such starfields, drop and bloom perfect;
Away… beyond temporal counting, save…
Our loneliness, do each to us affect;
As petal-drops, alone, our days reflect.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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