Love Torn | Lyrical Love

I wrote the following in response to RL King (Lady Day) , not intended it to be poetry, but with the intention of subverting my penchant for wordiness:

Anyone can write.
Anyone can show reality.
Or even bend it to the surreal.
Or to the abstract.
Even bend it to the romantic with your will.
Not everyone can see like this.

Not everyone can see
The romantic in reality.
Not everyone understands.
That to be romantic.
You do not have to bend reality.
You only have to see what is there.
And not ignore the romantic in it.

Just remember–
Just not forget to remember–
Remember not to forget–
Or pretend not to see–
Or pretend you don’t know–
Or deliberately deny–
Or malevolently distort–
What is actually there.

This is what you do when you write.
You see.
You see how it is all there.
If you are not sure it is real.
Because you do not know it directly.
If you simply are sure.
Like there is an instinct telling you.
An intuition.
You believe it.
Sometimes shyly
Sometimes boldly.

When you do this.
Others will see.
They will step forward.
Some will deny it.
But more will say:
“Yes. I see that too.
“I was afraid to tell anyone.
“How beautiful I thought it was.”

via Love Torn | Lyrical Love.

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The Inverse:

And for the inverse, I offer up the following:

  1. C                                                    1             (14
  2. A                                     1                            (7
  3. B                     1                                            (8
  4. A                                     2                            (5
  5. C                                                    2             (9
    .
  6. B                     2                                            (6
  7. A                                     3                            (2
  8. B                     3                                            (3
  9. C                                                    3             (4
    .
  10. E           1                                                      (13
  11. D     2                                                            (12
  12. D     2                                                            (10
  13. E           1                                                      (11
  14. C                                                    4             (1

Interpret it as you will!  No, I relent.  As in the previous example, the columns are:

  • line number,
  • lettered rhymescheme,
  • numbered instance of each rhyme, staggered for easier reading,
  • and finally, a number designation of each discrete rhyming word.

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Sonnet: (template) ((More “Etudes” comming))…

This…  is evidently the way in which I avoid working on my poetry.  As well, this is evidently the way in which I avoid working on my sonnet site.  Am I the archetypal mismatcher–the quintessential oppositional personality?  I shall let you be the judge.

In any event, I offer up the following for your consideration:

  1. C                                                1          (1
  2. A                                 1                         (2
  3. B                  1                                        (3
  4. C                                                2          (4
    .
  5. A                                 2                         (5
  6. B                  2                                        (6
  7. A                                 3                         (7
  8. B                  3                                        (8
  9. C                                                3          (9
    .
  10. D            1                                              (10
  11. E      1                                                    (11
  12. D            2                                              (12
  13. E      2                                                    (13
  14. C                                                4          (14

Recently I have experimented with Italian varieties wherein the lines numbered 9 and 14 rhyme.  The above is an attempt to create a unique form specific to this idea rather than simply modifying the Petrarchan (Italian) scheme.  My only quandary now, is what to call it….  “Northwestern” perhaps?  “Portlandian?”  “455,” as in “four five five?”

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Tone: I think this post was most inspired by…

rarasaur, because of the smiles I find to be left upon my face after visiting her site and reading her stories.  I would be very interested to read what any of you out there reading this might think regarding this subject:

This morning I have been thinking upon the nature of not just artistic blogging, but blogging in general.  Those sites to which I enjoy–and to which I find myself returning again and again, tend to have a constant tone.  Particularly are these the ones which, after having visited for a while, I find have left me feeling enriched in one way or another–not necessarily happy, I should remark, but certainly further along on any number of emotions which might be though of as positive. Continue reading

Such things sometimes appear synergistically in…

…ways quite mysterious.  Today’s sonnet, and it’s companion are written in response or reflection to this post.  These few offhand words by Lady Day struck me a certain way–sparked, one might say a memory.  Regarding the nature of love, and work, and how, so very often, hard work is the very way, particularly among men, in which we most often express our love.  Need it be that way?  I do not believe myself to be a perfect judge of such things.  I will here state that it may depend somewhat on temperament.  I have found it in myself at times, to be necessary–or at least to seem so–to make myself harder and more practical–and this can, very naturally, push ones romantic nature to the back, while bringing to the fore ones desire to do such practical things as life may sometimes demand. Continue reading

Silent sound

This is a most beautiful piece. You do such free verse very nicely. Inspiring to me. I love the spare feel. Particularly because when one is outside–among nature, as it were, one feels so small–so vulnerable.  Yet, on the one hand, so much beauty surrounds us; on the other hand, it can harm, or even kill us. Part of nature’s charm is in its danger, and it is, I believe a good part of why we feel so satisfied when we tame a small portion of it.

Björn Rudbergs writings

20120828-230127.jpg
Today
Into the fog
The many shades of grey
As nature lost the colors normally
It has
The goal
We know so well looks different
The sounds so silently
We talk not loud
Today
—-
August 28, 2012

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In Defense Of Doing It Right The First Time | mishaburnett

To Misha Burnett:

I may not have given this impression upon our first meeting, however it is true that I am a rather shy person, all things considered. I confess that, for that reason, among others, I have not been following along. With that in mind, I should say that my surmise is that this post may be in response to comments on your second book.

First, let me here state that I found it most brilliant. Thoroughly enjoyable. I have read it once and am now reading it a second time aloud for my dear Mrs. Emeron’s enjoyment. I have given your name to several of my colleagues, directing them quite enthusiastically to buy your books. One gentleman in particular I think will greatly enjoy it; and I will, in particular, hound him when next I see him if I find he has not yet purchased it. I have helped to bring him into the 21st century this last year, so he is already well-versed in these matters and should easily be able to manage the two or three clicks necessary to do so.

As far as go the minor editing mistakes, I believe it is very true that one cannot find them all on ones own. This is a function of the way our brains work. As an author, I know what is–or rather, what should be–there; this being the case, I may not be able to “see” a missing or repeated word. But truly, there are editors who specialise in this kind of work and I hear they are quite affordable.

Although this is not my profession–no, quite the contrary; I deal daily in abstract symbols and concepts–I might have helped with these minor points, had I been one of your so named “beta-readers.” But alas I am far too shy, and therefore reticent to ask for such an honoured position.

Being, as I am, possessed of a neuro-atypical brain I do tend to see small errors others will not see; but on the other hand, I will not see such errors as are seen easily by others as well, so in any case, I would never be able to compete in the editing market as a paid editor even if it were my desire to do so.

I am no stranger to pain at my age, so I do realise how ones mood and condition may colour ones perspective and, as a result, ones comments. Even given that, certainly you are correct: Everyone writes differently; I myself use a variety of techniques whether writing sonnets or fiction. Sometimes, I write in layers and sometimes I outline. Quite often, I do none of these things, preferring to write from start to finish without pausing at all for reflection.

Since you are now a published author, I would not presume to give you advice–nor would I if the case were otherwise, as I have noticed writers invariably give other writers poor advice and would not want to contribute negatively in this way. I will here state just this one thing: Keep writing. Do not stop. No matter what anyone may suggest. Keep writing.

via In Defense Of Doing It Right The First Time | mishaburnett.