Today’s pair, and other stories….

This one probably cannot be analysed outside of the context of its accompanying sonnet.  Still it would be a difficult task for anyone but Browning.  Or God.

Oddly though, there are many ways in which these both may be read; and yet, the intended meaning might be more difficult to divine than such as I more usually write.

On another note:  I believe I shall not move sonnets around, except in rare circumstances.  I think it will make things simpler.   If I write sonnets in sequences that are interspersed with others, I can simply link them with a unique tag.  This will make it seem less futile to insert the “next” links.  Which, when I move things around, are rather a chore to fix, because they are not automatically generated.  I suppose that would be the advantage of ftp access, or at least a professional theme.  We shall see.

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While you were sleeping…

…I took an in-depth look at major and minor wordpress technicals, widget redesign and selection, and other new and improved ™ items.  As well, did I flirt briefly with a couple of “paid” features, the use of which I will not allow myself without setting some goal or other.
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“Dots” not disappearing, once again, in WordPress…

…again.  I have tried all manner of cookie manipulation/eradication.  “Nothin’ doin’,” so to speak.  Multiple browsers on multiple platforms both on Un*x and Window$ have this behaviour, so it appears that the Automattic boys have “fixed” something again… possibly….

I have done it!!!

I have, indeed, completed all the “<— previous — view — next —>” links. I have been working on it a little at a time. And now I am done! Sometimes I would add the links from the older toward the newer. Sometimes, since I have been adding the links to all the new posts, I have added some at the front, slowly working my way from the newer to the older. Occasionally, I have done some editing on a sonnet or introduction somewhere in between, and have added the links while I was there, which made the process seem faster–like being dealt a wild card, or a free square in a crossword, or in “Scrabble.”

Now I can go back to archiving the site posts in skydrive, which had been my “do it when I have free time” project, prior to this.

 

Light at the end of the tunnel!!

If you still see the space in the list, beginning with “the 101″…  which is still present as of October, 2013…

If you look toward the right column wherein I have posted links to sequences, unless by the time you have read this, my work therein has been completed, you will see within the link category named “sequences,” a space.  Of course all the link categories to the right are involving sequences, apart from the default links, the calendar, recent posts, etc.  In any case, as of this writing you will still see a space after which you will see a link for “the 101.”

This space marks the division between my previous method of linking (using menu widgets) and my new method (involving link widgets.)  The new method allows me to easily move a link from “sequences” to, for example “featured” or some other heading simply by editing the link in question and changing the category to which it belongs.  This is a great labour-saving system, but it has been a very long process, as I have set about reworking some aspects of the site.

What has inspired this post is simply that I have noticed that the list of old links is growing small!  At first It felt as though it would never be completed.  The list of sequence seemed to have grown so large, you see; and I hadn’t really taken a good look at it until just this morning.  Only a scant handful of sequence left (plus possibly a few short sequences to which I hadn’t provided links before–I have, in fact, encountered a few of those here and there as I have been going over things)

It is a good feeling to see that ones work is progressing, even when the work in question is simple “scut work,” as our beloved combat engineer might term it.   For so very long the list after the vexing break and beginning with “the 101” has been much longer than the list of finished links; or so I thought.  Apparently, it has been of junior length for a long while now, and, all the while, escaping my notice.

In any case, here it is almost finished and I hadn’t even noticed the progress I had been making.  It just seemed like a long, long, task that would never come to an end.

Networking, Moderation, Lucasing, Creativity and other stories| David Emeron: Sonnets

To lucas or not. To moderate or not. To unrestrict or not.

This is a very strange topic. I would not have expected you to take note. Very true regarding creating/over editing. Still it is a rather strange and immediate medium we have here. In the 1800s, one might spend a year or so reworking and otherwise going over a book of poetry before even submitting it to a publisher (for even more re-edits.) I see this current process as a way to watch a work evolve–if anyone might be interested.

You may find this hard to believe, but I do not do that much lucasing–not nearly as much as you might guess. I am not obsessive with it. But when I find an error while reading something aloud (usually to Mrs. Emeron) I take advantage of my notice. There is something about a change in modalities that brings to light things one may have missed. For example, I can go over and over and over a new piece in the editing mode (black print on white) and then look at the published post–even just a glance (white print on black) and I will find things I will have missed before. Reading aloud has a similar effect. Even reading either to myself, or to Mrs. Emeron or to a colleague–all three of these are like different modalities and cause me to see things I did not see before.

I do change things when I notice them, or when the light goes on above my head and I exclaim “Eureka! Why did I not see this before!!”

I do feel a bit lonely for writing as I have been working on other things and using that hiatus to reformat what I already have written. It does please me to fix my excessive punctuation and give my works titles and streamline and fix my “sequences.” But very true, apart from some edits that I perform it is mostly digital grunt work. It is a way I can keep my hand in with what is now very limited time.

Still, I hear that appeals attorney Dr. Alan Dershowitz writes TWO sonnets every day and has for many years–even given his very full schedule. However, Google, Bing, &c. find no mention of it. When looking around to see if any are published, either in book form or web form somewhere, I find nothing, so perhaps the individual who told me this made it all up. One would think one might find at least a few hits on it or a mention of it in wikipedia, but I can find nothing.

If I were, for example, a marxist operative I might tell a poet something like this if I wanted to stop him from writing in the hopes that it would dishearten his attempts. Still I find it hard to believe that anyone, marxist or otherwise would notice, let alone care about, my four hits a day–which is what I receive if I am not actively engaged in the back and forth of the blogosphere.

In any case, my point is that one may write one sonnet every day–or two–no matter what one is doing. One might have to resort to a trick or two–speed writing techniques, I mean. I have, in fact, experimented with these. They do work. I can write a well-formed sonnet in under 10 minutes. But even though they read nicely and one might not be able to tell that they were that quickly written, still, there is no substitute for the type of sonnet that takes days of research and meditation and revision and experimentation to write. Both can be nice to read, but one can generally tell one from the other.

Partly, that is what the “Etudes” series is about: namely concentrating on types of writing and types of sound without worrying too much about what is being written. It is an interesting process because one sees in such cases what simply pops out of ones subconscious.

So in essence, I may spend 10 minutes when that is all I have and longer when I have more time to spend. Still, I admit I have been enjoying the re-editing process, most of which is cosmetic and functional rather than content modifying.

If I had my site hosted elsewhere, I could fix some things more quickly by writing shell scripts. I despair whenever I think that now that I have merged all three sites into one, all the internal links mentioned in posts or comments need to be fixed. There is no way I can do this easily. I simply fix deal links when I notice them, or if someone else brings them to my attention.

Ye Gods! But I do go on!! I think I should repost this as a regular entry.  And in fact, I just did so.

via Networking and selfish acts(free advertising tips) | Thoughts From a Mind Full of Dreams | David Emeron: Sonnets.

Can’tact me:

Of late, I find myself contemplating leaving the comment section of this blog “wide open,” i.e. deigning not to require logins or even unique UIDs. Would anyone like to weigh in on this matter?

In addition, I have recently added a contact page; although wordpress is still the best way to get in touch with me. I check my email approximately once a month unless I am specifically expecting an email from someone, or for some reason. I have therefore listed such contact information in descending order of effectiveness. I have never, for example, even run a skype client under my publicly known name; and wordpress does not allow active skype URIs in any event. However, in the event that someone is feeling very, very lucky and happens to catch me in an especially amiable mood, I offer up my skype ID in the event that said individual should wish to dial me over and over until his fingers bleed.”

On an unrelated note, I believe the next pay service I may buy on wordpress by way of celebration of some goal achieved will be the “No Ad” service. Even though such ads are only presented on individual posts and only to logged-out users; still, unpredictable content rankles my aesthetic sense–such as it is.