Follow-Up on Teaching Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

Andrew
Aug 22, 2013 @ 10:15:42

One thing at a time. :-)

It’s been my experience that students can count syllables, and get 10 syllables into a line, far easier than they can match the iambic pentameter. The iambic pentameter only came for me after about thirty sonnets — so I think it’s less of a priority. We want students to get over three hurdles first: writing fourteen lines, writing a rhyme scheme, and writing ten syllables in a line. The iamb can come later, because it’s a “sounds like this” issue, which gets solved by kids who care about writing more than one or two.

I could have sworn that it was Dershowitz, but it’s now been at least a decade since I read the report, and the name of the lawyer has long since escaped me. It was about the time of the O.J. Simpson trial, as I recall, or before, so it may not be on the Web — given that it was 1994. It was a profile of a prominent lawyer of the era, might have been Harper’s magazine or The Atlantic…

As for your sonnet sequence, I like it. It conveys feelings of doubt and uncertainty, and solitude; but it’s very much rooted in internal feeling and abstract language, rather than in the macrocosmic world of objects and things and processes. I tend to lean more into the world of objects than you, but it may be an advantage in the poetry world these days.

via Follow-Up on Teaching Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth.

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This latest…

addition to a sequence, comes at rather a late hour, in more ways than one.  I have been preoccupied with a trip I am planning to take at the beginning of April, 2013–the first of such travel in quite a long while for me.  I found myself avoiding everything–including thought.  Still, tonight I had to see if I could push through it.  I am pleased to see that I am able to do so.  I have posted tonight’s entry which is now scheduled to go up on the 28th.  So the “addition” link will not be live until then.  The “sequence” link is good, but will not include the new entry until then.

The newest entry is a Reverse Spenserian with alternating rhyme at the first of the line–alternating similar sounds.  Plus a few internal rhymes as well.  The Reverse Spenserian scheme has a slowly metamorphosing rhyme sound scheme.  So each new rhyme is related to the last in some way.  And each alternative rhyme is related to its former by an addition of an ‘R’ sound added to the final vowel syllable.