The Inverse:

And for the inverse, I offer up the following:

  1. C                                                    1             (14
  2. A                                     1                            (7
  3. B                     1                                            (8
  4. A                                     2                            (5
  5. C                                                    2             (9
    .
  6. B                     2                                            (6
  7. A                                     3                            (2
  8. B                     3                                            (3
  9. C                                                    3             (4
    .
  10. E           1                                                      (13
  11. D     2                                                            (12
  12. D     2                                                            (10
  13. E           1                                                      (11
  14. C                                                    4             (1

Interpret it as you will!  No, I relent.  As in the previous example, the columns are:

  • line number,
  • lettered rhymescheme,
  • numbered instance of each rhyme, staggered for easier reading,
  • and finally, a number designation of each discrete rhyming word.

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Sonnet: (template) ((More “Etudes” comming))…

This…  is evidently the way in which I avoid working on my poetry.  As well, this is evidently the way in which I avoid working on my sonnet site.  Am I the archetypal mismatcher–the quintessential oppositional personality?  I shall let you be the judge.

In any event, I offer up the following for your consideration:

  1. C                                                1          (1
  2. A                                 1                         (2
  3. B                  1                                        (3
  4. C                                                2          (4
    .
  5. A                                 2                         (5
  6. B                  2                                        (6
  7. A                                 3                         (7
  8. B                  3                                        (8
  9. C                                                3          (9
    .
  10. D            1                                              (10
  11. E      1                                                    (11
  12. D            2                                              (12
  13. E      2                                                    (13
  14. C                                                4          (14

Recently I have experimented with Italian varieties wherein the lines numbered 9 and 14 rhyme.  The above is an attempt to create a unique form specific to this idea rather than simply modifying the Petrarchan (Italian) scheme.  My only quandary now, is what to call it….  “Northwestern” perhaps?  “Portlandian?”  “455,” as in “four five five?”

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Sonnet X: Fell

Fell to Love, fell to beauty, fell to lore,
Fell to dance, fell to music; fell to whose
Enthral, embrace, encapsulating muse
Who gave, who held, who sheltered me, who swore
This oath to any failing excuse.

And fast was sealed, unbreakable before
A moment passed, this oath to me adore–
Adore, allow, and compromise refuse
To grant, to sanction; not in war, nor peace,
Nor gravity, nor passion, nor caprice;

In every moment, promised to hold true;
In every second, took me deep into
A distant land where none could me pursue–
So taken by a grasp that cannot cease.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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