Haiku introductions are…

…interesting and fun to write. Particularly sequences. However, a month or two ago, I rediscovered, by way of another poetry blogger, the non syllabic form of haiku. This using 5 – 7 – 5 word count, rather than counting syllables. I have been favourably disposed to doing those, however of late have discovered yet another way to meld my love for sonnets with my interest in Haiku. Continue reading

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When I click “like”…

…on one of my posts, it is not only because I like it very much, but also, because I have decided I am finished, absolutely and positively, with any and all lucasing. (still, there may be prequels though)

Even givinn this, I still feel a bit funny or guilty clicking on my own work. But so far I haven’t gone blind. And anyway, I have found that if one wants ones own blogs to appear in ones “reader,” then one must “follow” one’s own blog as well. I have done so, and haven’t gone blind from that either.

Now, here’s where, if I were already blind, I would admit it. But upfront, I’ll let everyone know that that is not the case; I am not blind.

In Defense Of Doing It Right The First Time | mishaburnett

To Misha Burnett:

I may not have given this impression upon our first meeting, however it is true that I am a rather shy person, all things considered. I confess that, for that reason, among others, I have not been following along. With that in mind, I should say that my surmise is that this post may be in response to comments on your second book.

First, let me here state that I found it most brilliant. Thoroughly enjoyable. I have read it once and am now reading it a second time aloud for my dear Mrs. Emeron’s enjoyment. I have given your name to several of my colleagues, directing them quite enthusiastically to buy your books. One gentleman in particular I think will greatly enjoy it; and I will, in particular, hound him when next I see him if I find he has not yet purchased it. I have helped to bring him into the 21st century this last year, so he is already well-versed in these matters and should easily be able to manage the two or three clicks necessary to do so.

As far as go the minor editing mistakes, I believe it is very true that one cannot find them all on ones own. This is a function of the way our brains work. As an author, I know what is–or rather, what should be–there; this being the case, I may not be able to “see” a missing or repeated word. But truly, there are editors who specialise in this kind of work and I hear they are quite affordable.

Although this is not my profession–no, quite the contrary; I deal daily in abstract symbols and concepts–I might have helped with these minor points, had I been one of your so named “beta-readers.” But alas I am far too shy, and therefore reticent to ask for such an honoured position.

Being, as I am, possessed of a neuro-atypical brain I do tend to see small errors others will not see; but on the other hand, I will not see such errors as are seen easily by others as well, so in any case, I would never be able to compete in the editing market as a paid editor even if it were my desire to do so.

I am no stranger to pain at my age, so I do realise how ones mood and condition may colour ones perspective and, as a result, ones comments. Even given that, certainly you are correct: Everyone writes differently; I myself use a variety of techniques whether writing sonnets or fiction. Sometimes, I write in layers and sometimes I outline. Quite often, I do none of these things, preferring to write from start to finish without pausing at all for reflection.

Since you are now a published author, I would not presume to give you advice–nor would I if the case were otherwise, as I have noticed writers invariably give other writers poor advice and would not want to contribute negatively in this way. I will here state just this one thing: Keep writing. Do not stop. No matter what anyone may suggest. Keep writing.

via In Defense Of Doing It Right The First Time | mishaburnett.

This morning’s piece…

…is, once again, a new work, written, albeit more directly this time, and not from memory, from two much, much older works. Both of these were two quatrains of Octameter. This was approximately the correct number of words and syllables to make a sonnet. 8 * 8 * 2 gives us 128 syllables. I kept the rhymes, although I moved them so they would ring with each other in a manner more true. Also Added a few more; so that, in all lines, there are three rhyming words, but sometimes there are four. Continue reading

And this does seem…

…to be one of those nights, as the saying goes. Tonight, I feel very much inclined to take the easy road, but the narrow gravel switchbacks with brittle crumbling edges seem to keep presenting themselves. Drafts keep piling up on top of my posts, spoiling my view of work I have already completed–vexing me at every turn.

There are some sonnet projects…

…even single ones, that require so much thought, that it is far less painful to work on them a little at a time. Works such as this one take at least a few days of thinking upon. I would revisit the draft at least once per day, type a note or two, or a phrase I thought was usable. Anything that occurs between periods of sleep is always easier. It just comes together almost like magic all of a sudden. Continue reading