All the way through September 15th…

…have I added those “<— previous — view — next —>” style links. It seems that it will never be done, but, in reality, I believe I’m getting close to finishing.

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This morning’s piece…

…is, once again, a new work, written, albeit more directly this time, and not from memory, from two much, much older works. Both of these were two quatrains of Octameter. This was approximately the correct number of words and syllables to make a sonnet. 8 * 8 * 2 gives us 128 syllables. I kept the rhymes, although I moved them so they would ring with each other in a manner more true. Also Added a few more; so that, in all lines, there are three rhyming words, but sometimes there are four. Continue reading

Also, today’s sonnet has named itself…

…as I found out this morning.   I had forgotten to give its default title of “Sonnet” and so I noticed.  “Oh my there is a post called ‘1914.”  I don’t recall making that one!  I wonder what it is?!?!?!?”

So I decided that since it named itself, I’d honor its choice of name.  So…   “Sonnet: 1914” it is!!!

I think now, that I would like it very much if my sweetheart were to suggest names for some of these unnamed sonnets that I might add in.  And perhaps I’ll ask some of you to suggest some?  That might be fun!

I have long thought that something happened to art–not just poetry, but all art–somewhere between the late 1890s to 1920. Continue reading

Odes and Sonnets are…

…related in a way I just discovered.  Regarding these two, the first is a reflection of an ode to S.T.C. (of Ancient Mariner fame)  Which is written in iambic heptameter in ten couplets, or five quatrains, if you prefer (and incidentally, the way it was originally written.)  This ode will you find down below within the grey box. Continue reading

It really is quite…

…interesting how, in general, creating a rhyme scheme in advance is more effective and efficient than creating blank verse in advance and fitting the rhyme scheme later.  Until I had tried both methods I would not have guessed this.  Writing the blank verse first is more useful if you have a specific work you wish to adapt to sonnet form; however, writing something brand new is much easier the other way around.  It’s easier–much easier–working an idea into 14 evenly spaced lines that already rhyme, than it is to write fourteen lines of blank verse and modify it to conform to one rhyme scheme or another.