φίλει ἐμὲ for now | 0over0

The following is in response to this lovely account:

φίλει ἐμὲ for now | 0over0.

(I have reposted it here as per my rule of “write a novel as a comment; then you should probably republish it yourself also!”)

I love this story, sir. Your writing is very clear and beautiful.

By way of full disclosure, I should admit to you that I am an atheist–but… I am not “that” kind of atheist. In fact, one of my best friends has charitably described me as a “full Gospel atheist.” (as has Dear Mrs. Emeron–who most definitely is a woman of deep and abiding faith) He further, and perhaps with even more Christian Charity, draws the distinction between an atheist and an anti-theist. Even further, he insists that most atheists, so-called, are firmly of this second category–in this, he may be correct, I am not sure, for I am hardly a man of the world. Even more further, furtherer… he insists that this anti-theism is a religion in and of itself; in this I believe he is dead on.

Whether or not there is a God would not change the clear fact that we are “wired,” so to speak, for faith. (there is ever-growing scientific evidence for that) And it is my contention, and has been my observation, that when that “hole,” for want of a better term, in our hearts, or minds, if you will, is not filled with that for which it is designed to be filled, all manner of insanity will often ensue. People in such a condition end up believing in all sorts of nonsense–not the least of which is responsible for much human suffering–such as in the former eastern block, to give a ready example.

I therefore often caution people like me–as well as cautioning myself–to take great care regarding any unprovable worldly beliefs into which they may unwittingly fall. Belief is meant for God, not economic or political theories or unrepeatable scientific events.

Therefore, I am happy to pray with and for my Christian friends. I am happy–very thankful–if and when they pray for me. Saying grace at each and every meal helps me to see my fortune for what it is. And of course, He and His Son figure greatly in my published work for any number of reasons, not the least of which is that… well… how can 4000 years of liturgical tradition not colour, in fact completely fill in, all aspects in the whole of our culture–if not all of creation.

I was once a man of deeply held faith. I miss it. And truth be told, I dearly hope I am wrong and my Christian friends are right. I mean this with complete sincerity, and with all the humility I can muster, which I hope I have here conveyed.

Your writing, and your faith, are quite beautiful. Please do keep it up; and, if you have time, please do keep in touch.

via φίλει ἐμὲ for now | 0over0.

The Viking Situation:

Herein I attempt to link all the relevant posts wherever they may be:

  1. First: the location of the original exchange:  February 7th, 2013 at 4:03 am
  2. Next, the whole enchilada:  My first…
  3. Next, the introduction which you (kanzensakura) stumbled upon:  Where is Waldo?
  4. And the sonnet I wrote inspired by the whole exchange:  Sonnet:
  5. Finally, a note about the piece–titled referent to my research on the subject:   FYI

Now, after and, I think during the hole affair, there were even some very peculiar emails exchanged.  They seemed to appear in great heaps.  Those, however, I did not save, and had I saved them, I would not publish them here for ethical reasons–even if I chose to redact the identity of the author of these.

Related articles (only the first two are actually related, heh)

Some thoughts about Mary and Martha. | kanzensakura

I feel I have of late had a bit of trouble extending my hand lately. Perhaps fearing the feel of things. Perhaps it has been this strange hiatus which is to blame. But I think not.

In any case, I very much enjoyed your thoughts regarding Mary and Martha. This is the stuff of which a good sermon is made. I think perhaps I have written less lately because of this. I must think about it more. The fact is, I have written so many sonnets that I know–almost like a professional writer knows, although I am most certainly not that–I can write one on demand at any time, and no matter how I feel.

I suppose I thought I’d push through, as it were, and write a (for me) short note to you here. In any case, your sermon notes upon Martha and Mary have given me something to think about.

On a lighter note. I do not remember ever having read a bible with such modern English. I prefer the KJV, (of course) and (also of course) have no trouble with its language! (which I am quite sure is fairly obvious by the work I have posted : )

When I was a bit younger, there was published a thing called “The Living Bible.” This was and is a paraphrased version of the Bible in modern English (of the 1970ies.) One tends, I think to regard more modernised version of the Bible as being similar to this version.

The trouble with paraphrased versions of the Bible is that they were heavily dependent on the understanding of the individual doing the paraphrasing. This meant that there were shades of meaning that were very difficult to divine whether, as some Christians might put it, ones reading was spirit-led or not.

However, an aspect of most modern Bibles, about which the majority of people are unaware, is that they are all more faithfully translated now regardless of the type of language they employ. This is due in part to more and older texts being unearthed and translated and made readily available.

Still… even though undeniably more accurate now–as are virtually all modern versions–Bibles in modern English are one new trick with which this old dog has a bit of trouble.

As ever, please do cast my missing or illegal grammar to the swine; no doubt it could well be named Legion, for they are many.

via Who Is Kanzen Sakura? | kanzensakura.
and Radical Hospitality of Jesus | lamzemsalira

And this is the moment wherein I click all the random, most likely not related links below:

Sonnet: The Third Law

When breaks the dawn again affirming day,
This iridescent treasure, doth the sun,
Come supplely spreading visions, doth the one
Who made it known in every spreading ray;

When, just as day began, its noble way
Can never be impeded. Neither shun,
That life itself hath once again begun;
That never will its paradox delay.

The measure of a a man shall always be
His motion, or determinicity;
His ever ready willingness, to shine
As will he, ever happiness to find.
For such is life, as such is ever light,
That finds its final triumph in the night.