Sonnet VII: Lucky

It’s true, I always get what I desire,
But most of my desires rest in you.
Such boyish dreams, but definitely knew
What would, in all complexity, transpire;

I knew the field, I knew the world entire;
And this, that every wish of mine came true.
I saw our lives as they began anew,
And understood what life would then require.

That both of us, so perfectly sincere;
So very much as when we first began;
And now, as once we did, we would declare;
As strong as ever once, and as severe;
And all our long tomorrows, better than
Our yesterdays; and all beyond compare.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet VI: Nurtured Nature

I lay in thought, while others raced ahead.
Until I understood what friendship was.
I chose to look, while others leapt  instead,
And learned what loving is, and what it does.

I searched inside, while many never could,
To troll the depths and nature of desire,
Though scorned, I searched until I understood
The metal that would fealty require.

I learned; and kept  my friendship, burning love,
And deep desire, gilt like royalty;
For now, I knew the worth and nature of
Such strong emotions wrapped in loyalty:

So nurtured, close together, as they grew,
Until the day I gave them all to you.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet V: Bad Times

Love, have I hurt you, yet you love me still;
When I am bitter; still you understand;
You knew I was alone, and took my hand;
And knew I loved you as I always will.

Love me, as I love you, though you’ve hurt me;
So fine you are, how could I but forgive;
The girl whose magic taught a boy to live;
The woman who would teach a man to see.

We never let our circumstance prevail;
And ever after felt our bold belief;
What power, this, may triumph over grief;
And leaves but little meaningless travail.

Not fire for strength, to grist the mill, nor more
To climb–No hill–but bad times to ignore.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet IV: Sandcastles

Is there a way that might I ache yet more?
For, missing thee is more than can I stand;
Yet also, do I ache by my own hand
For fearing action, boyish on that score,

That would us bring together all the more.
How pure would be our life were I a man?
If rather built, a castle than of sand,
I could, a dream produce in granite, or

At least, could give some substance to our life,
Which long we spun with threads of gossamer.
Remote, has been our touch–not man, nor wife,
Could we, ourselves, have truly called, for fear
Of facing a reality too sad,
Dispersing but what little web we had.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet III: Alone

How can I feel my life without the touch
Of love’s own sweet, pristine, embracing calm.
How then can I exist without as much
As any common man in any realm

Would have, without much more, perhaps, than bare
Awareness–not so much as realizing
Fairness that exists within the care
Of natures quickened earth–whose mesmerizing

Beauty touches all mankind for better
Or for worse. For deprivation is
His Lordship’s curse. His worth alone, is met
By sky, and sky, in turn, by earth. And His

Domain is cold, and far removed from She
Who hungers so relentlessly for mee.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet II: Challenge

How may a challenge take so many names:
The first, a journey struck with spirit bright;
The next, a stolid, firm, determined, fight;
And then, a simple, tired tread–a game

Although the dream were dead–and next, it came
Relentless, as it yet were sanctified;
Without surrender, lest be dignified
Thus; that the game were lost? The very blame

Was hidden in the cost of keeping on
Within a blackened dream. How challenging
This fourfold path must seem, when what is gone
Is purity, which such a dream may bring.

But fivefold is the path of righteous grief,
When challenge is pursued without belief.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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Sonnet I: Grades of Paper

Upon a time, my love, a diary
Of paper, stained with words set down in ink;
Revealing all a boy might feel, and think,
And strive, and pray, and wonder what might be;

That, would he, worthy of thy love, decree?
On paper, yes; but also on the brink–
Withholding nothing more–profess; and think,
If then not worthy, tears he shed for thee

Would blur his ink; such tears as fell like rain
To paper; ran his words, as ran his heart,
Cascading down, as rivers, all his pain;
So mixt with joy, and hope we would not part.

Yet now, his tears, upon a keyboard, fall,
Not mixt with joy, nor pain, nor seen at all.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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