Intro 2: Her Faith

To she that kept faith,
Such nights: she dreamt but many,
As hath very few.

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Sonnet I: His Favour

At rest she lieth down within her bed,
Doth close long lidded eyes, though not to sleep
In her repose for soft, round limbs to rest;
And then, in longing yet, her thoughts toward him:

Of words so closely shared, or left unsaid;
Such secrets, told or not, as cause to weep;
With his remembrance tight against her prest,
Though now, so tattered, once yet thought a whim,

Her tears to calm, his favour held instead,
That holdeth now her heart in safety’s keep,
To lull, so sweet her countenance, to rest–
Then close her eyes again, as night grew dim.

And once we wed, doth dream my love now deep,
As blest, our lives entwined, as any hymn.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence: click here to read it all:

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Sonnet: Perfection

When hast thou seen, as meant for only thee,
Such eyes as widen gaily at thy sight?
And at thy voice a face that ever bright
Hath lit as though thy soul hath set it free.

And hast thou heard a voice so peacefully
Conformed, as though it found a place to light
As warmly and as permanently might
A thing as claimed its perfect place so be?

Or hast thou not this wonder ever seen?
And hast thou not this perfect moment felt?
Nor felt thine own eyes widen, as for thee
Delighted by thine own, that face hath been?
Hast not thou love, as hath my love for mee?
Hast not thine heart within perfection dwelt?

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Sonnet V: The Wraith

Trust thou in she who would thy spirit lift;
For holdeth she thy course as straight and right,
Whose destinations found, with thee, delight–
This Hallowed ground from which thou shalt not drift.

Trust thou in she who is thy greatest gift;
For thee, thy darkened course would keep alight;
Whose only longing keepeth both from night;
And help thee right such wrongs when waters shift.

Thou canst not man thy tiller and thy spar;
Nor keep the watch and also plot thy course;
Nor man the pumps below and trim thy sail.
For shalt thou, on thy circle, travel far–
Much farther than alone wilt thou, perforce–
Alone, couldst not rejoice thou to prevail.

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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