Today’s pair, and other stories….

This one probably cannot be analysed outside of the context of its accompanying sonnet.  Still it would be a difficult task for anyone but Browning.  Or God.

Oddly though, there are many ways in which these both may be read; and yet, the intended meaning might be more difficult to divine than such as I more usually write.

On another note:  I believe I shall not move sonnets around, except in rare circumstances.  I think it will make things simpler.   If I write sonnets in sequences that are interspersed with others, I can simply link them with a unique tag.  This will make it seem less futile to insert the “next” links.  Which, when I move things around, are rather a chore to fix, because they are not automatically generated.  I suppose that would be the advantage of ftp access, or at least a professional theme.  We shall see.

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Regarding “Etudes” 11 and 12:

Rather than rearranging what I have scheduled to post, I shall delay #11, which will post on January 3rd, 2014.  Number 12, which is not yet completed will most likely be done this morning(ish) and will therefore post on January 4th, 2014, or perhaps shortly thereafter.

Sorry to make all-y’all wait this long ; )

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The Inverse:

And for the inverse, I offer up the following:

  1. C                                                    1             (14
  2. A                                     1                            (7
  3. B                     1                                            (8
  4. A                                     2                            (5
  5. C                                                    2             (9
    .
  6. B                     2                                            (6
  7. A                                     3                            (2
  8. B                     3                                            (3
  9. C                                                    3             (4
    .
  10. E           1                                                      (13
  11. D     2                                                            (12
  12. D     2                                                            (10
  13. E           1                                                      (11
  14. C                                                    4             (1

Interpret it as you will!  No, I relent.  As in the previous example, the columns are:

  • line number,
  • lettered rhymescheme,
  • numbered instance of each rhyme, staggered for easier reading,
  • and finally, a number designation of each discrete rhyming word.

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Sonnet: (template) ((More “Etudes” comming))…

This…  is evidently the way in which I avoid working on my poetry.  As well, this is evidently the way in which I avoid working on my sonnet site.  Am I the archetypal mismatcher–the quintessential oppositional personality?  I shall let you be the judge.

In any event, I offer up the following for your consideration:

  1. C                                                1          (1
  2. A                                 1                         (2
  3. B                  1                                        (3
  4. C                                                2          (4
    .
  5. A                                 2                         (5
  6. B                  2                                        (6
  7. A                                 3                         (7
  8. B                  3                                        (8
  9. C                                                3          (9
    .
  10. D            1                                              (10
  11. E      1                                                    (11
  12. D            2                                              (12
  13. E      2                                                    (13
  14. C                                                4          (14

Recently I have experimented with Italian varieties wherein the lines numbered 9 and 14 rhyme.  The above is an attempt to create a unique form specific to this idea rather than simply modifying the Petrarchan (Italian) scheme.  My only quandary now, is what to call it….  “Northwestern” perhaps?  “Portlandian?”  “455,” as in “four five five?”

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The Male Form…

…as seen from my own point of view…

This sequence is posting at present is a celebration of The Male Form.  I believe it is complete as of this date–though one never really knows.  Its mirror image will post some time in the future.  As of this date, I still feel it to be an ongoing work, not having been rounded out, brought to cadence, &c.  There are possibly four more sonnets, give or take, in this distaff sequence.

One of the problems that I encounter with the writing of either sequence is that I can write endlessly on the subject of sensuality.  It is a subject on which I have thought in great detail and one which seems to me to possess an infinite number of facets.

I feel I would like to write more about the nature of such content, but I fear I would be misconstrued regardless.  I may do so at a later date at any case.  If I had more of an active readership, I could better compose such an essay as a reflection of whatever misconceptions crop up in the comment section–particularly in the members of the male sequence.  At this date, there are probably enough comments that it would be fairly easy to do this.  I am sure I would bore anyone to tears waxing infinite on such a subject.

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How to Teach Writing Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

Although I am indeed able to write a sonnet in far less than 15 minutes, (I have written six months worth of these at least one per day, and) I find that typically I spend several hours on each one; although this may include research or additional constraints on the form. I could add a few more weapons to the arsenal of method, so to speak, that… Continue reading