Part V of the…

…slowly unfolding female series, is rather an interesting one technically.  Composed, including its title, of word-count based haiku, which, as I have discovered lately can be written in iambic pentameter.  10 syllables per line, with 5 iambic feet, which consist of a feminine (unaccented) syllable followed by a masculine (accented.)  I do love additional constraints, they almost always make for an interesting sound, even if clarity is an even greater challenge. I’m sure I can see lucasing in this ones future, however.  Perhaps, even prequels, meesa thinkin’,  (perish the unholy thought!!!!)

In any case, I am reasonably certain that I will see obvious solutions to not so very obvious problems tomorrow.

More detail copied from the comment section in the above mentioned sonnet:

The form is a sonnet form I developed recently somewhere along the way while writing sonnets from other old works of mine. A few of them lent themselves very directly to sonnet form but had unique rhymeschemes such as this one, which is: 1a2a, 1b2b, 1c2c [1d][2d] (the rhymescheme being the same in the final couplet but compressed into only two lines.

The verses are grouped in three because each triplet of lines, if you count the title (which also rhymes with 2) are also word-count haiku, which are also iambic pentameter (five beats composed of one unaccented syllable and one accented, for those who are learning these terms, sometimes referred to as weak/strong, masculine/feminine, &c.)

A few weeks ago, I think it was, I thought one could compose a word-count haiku in iambic pentameter. Then today, it occurred to me that if one used a title to round out the number to 15 lines, 5 such haiku would fit exactly. So that added additional restrictions to the verse, (the more restriction, the merrier for me, as you well know) and also provided an interesting flow to the words.

I have done a few such experiments elsewhere.

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