Same word rhymes:

Sometimes they sound wrong; sometimes they sound right.  Does that about sum it up, so to speak?

I was reading over this sonnet recently reposted as one of a sequence of four.  In the third quatrain you will see:

But the Knights of the Copybook Headings
Show… that our apathy caused you to win;
We will never forget that beheadings,
Though… were the wages of this kind of sin.

I had originally changed this third rhyming word because of the identical or same word rhyme.  I realised after some time of reflection that it sounded fine the way it had been.  Why, I wondered, was that.  I believe the answer lies in the odd or feminine lines containing the duplicate word or sound.  This understanding opens up possibilities.  One has to do some thinking though regarding forms other than ABAB types, wherein the feminine lines are easily understood as such.  What about an Italian sonnet?

Hmmmm….   Does this not bear more thinking?

To the Master, Ben Jonson of England

Although perhaps everyone has heard the name Shakespeare, Not so many have heard of Jonson or of Donne–or of King, for that matter–It is a wonderful moment for most everyone when they do discover them. So I post a link to the above tribute to him, and an example below of one of his best known short poems. Such a lovely sentiment–both this original and the tribute.

To Celia

Drink to me only with thine eyes
And I will pledge with mine.
Or leave a kiss but in the cup
And I’ll not look for wine.

The thirst that from the soul doth rise
Doth ask a drink divine;
But might I of Jove’s nectar sup,
I would not change for thine.

I sent thee late a rosy wreath,
Not so much hon’ring thee
As giving it a hope that there
It could not withered be;

But thou thereon did’st only breathe,
And sent’st it back to me,
Since when it grows and smells, I swear
Not of itself, but thee.

Sometimes one project, and…

…the desire to compete it, may supersede all other motivations. Because of this, look for a bit of laurel-resting, after which I will write more “Etudes.” (I believe)

Still, the desire to continue with the “Shakespeare Project” is also forefront, as is my desire to write more “Canopians.”

I would also enjoy writing more split sonnets.  To that end, I have in mind a form wherein two sonnets, one with the reverse rhymescheme as the other–possibly in the Shakespearean style (with ABAB quatrains) are recombined as two new Shakespeareans.  If the two sonnets interlock well enough all four should be readable and perhaps I will explicitly publish both the originals and the interlocking version.  I believe such a thing would make the rhymes palindromic in nature.  Yes… but I have not given sufficient thought to the proof of this : )

In any case look for something new soon.  Probably not Canopians but probably Etudes in the Shakespearean form with inverse rhymes and possibly palindromic versions of them.

How to Teach Writing Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

Although I am indeed able to write a sonnet in far less than 15 minutes, (I have written six months worth of these at least one per day, and) I find that typically I spend several hours on each one; although this may include research or additional constraints on the form. I could add a few more weapons to the arsenal of method, so to speak, that… Continue reading

I think I really must merge all my blogs into one.

I say this because of the follow I received from the reference below.  And… because I feel it might make more sense in a logical and procedural way.

Considering the nature of my own site, this offering was most enjoyed. Although… I confess I feel most able to express myself in the strictest of forms such that I do not mind at all burdening such a form with additional constraints. You must judge for yourself if my words are elucidative or obfuscatory.

A word, then two, a fountain like a stream…

This is #5 in a sequence of seven (so far) oddly germane to this post of yours, which I very much enjoyed.
#6 of the same sequence features even more constraints as well as a generous helping of metaphor (given that my background is in the hard sciences) to which perusal of the entire sequence might offer some small illumination.

Of these seven, five are, as is the one above, in the (English version of the) Italian style, #4, as is yours above, in the Shakespearean style, and the one I mention, #6, is in a form which I call “reverse Spenserian,” a form of my own devising–although I may well not be the first to invent such a form. In any case, I have found that most sonnet forms reverse well, although in some cases, one needs to expand ones definition of reversal for such a thing to work.

via How Do You Sonnet? | The Poetry Question.

This latest…

addition to a sequence, comes at rather a late hour, in more ways than one.  I have been preoccupied with a trip I am planning to take at the beginning of April, 2013–the first of such travel in quite a long while for me.  I found myself avoiding everything–including thought.  Still, tonight I had to see if I could push through it.  I am pleased to see that I am able to do so.  I have posted tonight’s entry which is now scheduled to go up on the 28th.  So the “addition” link will not be live until then.  The “sequence” link is good, but will not include the new entry until then.

The newest entry is a Reverse Spenserian with alternating rhyme at the first of the line–alternating similar sounds.  Plus a few internal rhymes as well.  The Reverse Spenserian scheme has a slowly metamorphosing rhyme sound scheme.  So each new rhyme is related to the last in some way.  And each alternative rhyme is related to its former by an addition of an ‘R’ sound added to the final vowel syllable.

Why do the young man and I both love the dark lady?

I am, of course referring to Shakespeare’s sonnets. The most obvious element of the 154 sonnets has not been entertained. Perhaps this is because… I will not say it is due to the fact that no analysis of these sonnets has been performed by a poet. No, rather it is more possible that no poet or non poet, for that matter, has ever undertaken (as have I) to write a sequence of poems (and specifically sonnets) to himself.

Anyone who is familiar with me in the least will know that I tend toward long-winded explanations of subjects in which I am interested. However, here you will be disappointed. I will only state the following: Either first undertake the sequence I mentioned. Write yourself a sequence of poems–written from yourself as you are now, to yourself when much younger: a teen or a child perhaps.   It will help if they have the same form and perhaps would help more, for my purposes, if they were sonnets, but certainly, the more consistent structure, the better for this exercise. Write a sufficient number of them. Let us say… perhaps ten at the minimum. If you do this, you will know the answer to the question in the title of this article. You will not help but know the answer. Or if you are not willing to do this, you may read the next paragraph, but the answer will appear like speculation to you unless you have done what I ask.

The answer to the question is simply that these sonnets were all written by Mr. Shakespeare to his younger self. This renders both popular theories, one with merit, and one without, as incorrect. The first theory is obvious enough not to be stated, however it is that Shakespeare is writing to advise all young men, as there is no evidence of a particular young man whom he had befriended at the time the sonnets were written (during the plague, it seems, when he was all but “holed up” in his house and could not by law engage in his profession of staging his plays) the other theory is not worth a mention but marxists find one reason or another to promote it. Therefore I shan’t even justify it. It is without merit, and for more reasons than anyone is willing or able to state. Still… why not a message to all young men or a particular friend? His reference to the dark lady “that they both love” is the answer. But more than that there is no point in relating until you perform the exercise I suggest.

It is the simplest way to make the case (after which you should go back and read all 154 sonnets again.) Honestly. You will see that the ways in which someone speaks to his younger self are unique–are not, cannot be, those he would employ when speaking to anyone else. Try it. It will convince you! But, as I previously stated, all this will seem like supposition until you do as I ask.