Sonnet XII: Patronage

Hast thou the heart to touch, or even look
Upon such art as this and give its due
An thou profess as fanciful, outgrew,
Though for this canvas rapture overtook;

But are such things professed forever true:
That hath these sculpted works thy nature shook;
And shall thy past refinement be forsook,
Though long thou from thine innocence withdrew?

Rare, priceless, as may not be seen again,
Wilt claim thou of thy prime: the best doth wane;
And of this art, so fast a friend may come,
Though whether ancient made or new, as fast.
Shalt thou most proper frame such art at last,
Or once more to thy patronage succumb?

This sonnet is part of a short sequence; click here to read it all:

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10 responses to “Sonnet XII: Patronage

    • I think I am now quite satisfied, and could not have taken this one to completion until realising this new form.

      Since there is, in the sense that I have been using the term, no such thing as a “reverse Italian” Perhaps, this is the closest thing to it, and hence I should name it such.

      So… “Reverse Italian,” it is! in the only way I can envision this to be done–the reversing of the rhymescheme in the second quatrain. Otherwise, a “Reverse Italian” would simply be an Italian owing to the reflected rhymescheme.

      I have long enjoyed the sound of the first two quatrians of the Italian, because of the surprise in the tension that may be experienced therefrom. Yet, because lines four and five also rhyme, this somewhat diminishes the effect in the second quatrain; however, just this morning, I woke thinking if one reverses the rhymescheme in the second quatrain this can be avoided. In this way the same rhythmic tension might be achieved.

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  1. The pleasure is ours dear Mr. the rhyme scheme on this just makes my heart thump thump. I like this form you are doing. not only do we get a first rate work of art, we also get the pleasure of you explaining it to us – broadening our imagination and our brains.

    Liked by 1 person

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