In a few days will repost a sequence…

…which was and is essentially the catalyst to the Shakespeare project in that the insight I gained in writing these nine sonnets caused me to understand Will Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets in a way in which I could not have done had I not written these.  I have posted a link to this sequence to the right.  See the link entitled “Notes to Myself,” which I have also included here for convenience.

Follow-Up on Teaching Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

Andrew
Aug 22, 2013 @ 10:15:42

One thing at a time. :-)

It’s been my experience that students can count syllables, and get 10 syllables into a line, far easier than they can match the iambic pentameter. The iambic pentameter only came for me after about thirty sonnets — so I think it’s less of a priority. We want students to get over three hurdles first: writing fourteen lines, writing a rhyme scheme, and writing ten syllables in a line. The iamb can come later, because it’s a “sounds like this” issue, which gets solved by kids who care about writing more than one or two.

I could have sworn that it was Dershowitz, but it’s now been at least a decade since I read the report, and the name of the lawyer has long since escaped me. It was about the time of the O.J. Simpson trial, as I recall, or before, so it may not be on the Web — given that it was 1994. It was a profile of a prominent lawyer of the era, might have been Harper’s magazine or The Atlantic…

As for your sonnet sequence, I like it. It conveys feelings of doubt and uncertainty, and solitude; but it’s very much rooted in internal feeling and abstract language, rather than in the macrocosmic world of objects and things and processes. I tend to lean more into the world of objects than you, but it may be an advantage in the poetry world these days.

via Follow-Up on Teaching Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth.

Follow-Up on Teaching Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

A comment I wrote for a recent post caused me to revisit a few things and write the following comment; which once again, is a far too lengthy one  not to make of it a regular post.

I am at a loss to explain why you eschew iambic pentameter in your form exercise, as you say, “even if the poem makes no sense.” Although “One thing at a time” might be a guess at your answer–which certainly would make a degree of sense. Still the iambic rhythm is most definitely a thing to get ones head around.

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Networking, Moderation, Lucasing, Creativity and other stories| David Emeron: Sonnets

To lucas or not. To moderate or not. To unrestrict or not.

This is a very strange topic. I would not have expected you to take note. Very true regarding creating/over editing. Still it is a rather strange and immediate medium we have here. In the 1800s, one might spend a year or so reworking and otherwise going over a book of poetry before even submitting it to a publisher (for even more re-edits.) I see this current process as a way to watch a work evolve–if anyone might be interested.

You may find this hard to believe, but I do not do that much lucasing–not nearly as much as you might guess. I am not obsessive with it. But when I find an error while reading something aloud (usually to Mrs. Emeron) I take advantage of my notice. There is something about a change in modalities that brings to light things one may have missed. For example, I can go over and over and over a new piece in the editing mode (black print on white) and then look at the published post–even just a glance (white print on black) and I will find things I will have missed before. Reading aloud has a similar effect. Even reading either to myself, or to Mrs. Emeron or to a colleague–all three of these are like different modalities and cause me to see things I did not see before.

I do change things when I notice them, or when the light goes on above my head and I exclaim “Eureka! Why did I not see this before!!”

I do feel a bit lonely for writing as I have been working on other things and using that hiatus to reformat what I already have written. It does please me to fix my excessive punctuation and give my works titles and streamline and fix my “sequences.” But very true, apart from some edits that I perform it is mostly digital grunt work. It is a way I can keep my hand in with what is now very limited time.

Still, I hear that appeals attorney Dr. Alan Dershowitz writes TWO sonnets every day and has for many years–even given his very full schedule. However, Google, Bing, &c. find no mention of it. When looking around to see if any are published, either in book form or web form somewhere, I find nothing, so perhaps the individual who told me this made it all up. One would think one might find at least a few hits on it or a mention of it in wikipedia, but I can find nothing.

If I were, for example, a marxist operative I might tell a poet something like this if I wanted to stop him from writing in the hopes that it would dishearten his attempts. Still I find it hard to believe that anyone, marxist or otherwise would notice, let alone care about, my four hits a day–which is what I receive if I am not actively engaged in the back and forth of the blogosphere.

In any case, my point is that one may write one sonnet every day–or two–no matter what one is doing. One might have to resort to a trick or two–speed writing techniques, I mean. I have, in fact, experimented with these. They do work. I can write a well-formed sonnet in under 10 minutes. But even though they read nicely and one might not be able to tell that they were that quickly written, still, there is no substitute for the type of sonnet that takes days of research and meditation and revision and experimentation to write. Both can be nice to read, but one can generally tell one from the other.

Partly, that is what the “Etudes” series is about: namely concentrating on types of writing and types of sound without worrying too much about what is being written. It is an interesting process because one sees in such cases what simply pops out of ones subconscious.

So in essence, I may spend 10 minutes when that is all I have and longer when I have more time to spend. Still, I admit I have been enjoying the re-editing process, most of which is cosmetic and functional rather than content modifying.

If I had my site hosted elsewhere, I could fix some things more quickly by writing shell scripts. I despair whenever I think that now that I have merged all three sites into one, all the internal links mentioned in posts or comments need to be fixed. There is no way I can do this easily. I simply fix deal links when I notice them, or if someone else brings them to my attention.

Ye Gods! But I do go on!! I think I should repost this as a regular entry.  And in fact, I just did so.

via Networking and selfish acts(free advertising tips) | Thoughts From a Mind Full of Dreams | David Emeron: Sonnets.

How to Teach Writing Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

Although I am indeed able to write a sonnet in far less than 15 minutes, (I have written six months worth of these at least one per day, and) I find that typically I spend several hours on each one; although this may include research or additional constraints on the form. I could add a few more weapons to the arsenal of method, so to speak, that… Continue reading

The Viking Situation:

Herein I attempt to link all the relevant posts wherever they may be:

  1. First: the location of the original exchange:  February 7th, 2013 at 4:03 am
  2. Next, the whole enchilada:  My first…
  3. Next, the introduction which you (kanzensakura) stumbled upon:  Where is Waldo?
  4. And the sonnet I wrote inspired by the whole exchange:  Sonnet:
  5. Finally, a note about the piece–titled referent to my research on the subject:   FYI

Now, after and, I think during the hole affair, there were even some very peculiar emails exchanged.  They seemed to appear in great heaps.  Those, however, I did not save, and had I saved them, I would not publish them here for ethical reasons–even if I chose to redact the identity of the author of these.

Related articles (only the first two are actually related, heh)

The 101:

I have three steps so far from freeverse to decasyllabic line.  Next will be blankverse: in which I should approach iambic pentameter.  Five sounds of two syllables each all of which have a feminine first syllable and a masculine second.   And as was my plan before I was so rudely interrupted by existential sadness, I am backfilling with this project.  Which, thus far, I am enjoying greatly.  There is also some new material not related to this that I am in various stages of completing.  So, unless my work ethic disappears along with my sadness, I shouldn’t think I’ll have too much difficulty catching up.

Here is the sequence as it sits so far:

This is, of course, not a formal course, as I have neither qualifications nor experience with composing such things.

I may do a write up on each entry; however, as of now, this is not planned.  My more classically enabled sweetheart and, two dear and much more classically educated friends might be willing to help me with suggestions as to how to arrange such a thing.   Still, since I have the impression that this project will, at best,  receive one or two hits here and there, I am in no rush to do so.  Regarding the evolving sequence and the progressing sequence to follow, the sonnets themselves are the most important.

 

I’ll have enough to do as it is in catching myself up, as it were!

Wish me luck!