So, while taking…

…a bit of a break, I thought I might write a few words regarding the sequence I have been writing.  This is has been an interesting sequence for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that I am writing it from my sweetheart’s perspective.  This can be somewhat vexing; one does not wish to appear to be sounding ones own clarion, as it were.   Therefore, in the interest of the avoidance of an excess of self-aggrandisement, I have endeavoured to keep to quotes and memories of conversations and notes and letters that I have over the years received.  In this way I may use and/or paraphrase the words of others–particularly those of my sweet love, rather than my own.  Even then, it does strike one as rather embarrassing to write such things about oneself. Continue reading

Think And Grow Rich? Really?

Thank you for the visit, I myself have read many such classics, and knew long ago they were far from shallow tomes.

Teacher-preneur

A woman thinking

Desire backed by Faith knows no such word as impossible.

Every adversity brings with it the seed of an equivalent advantage.

– Napoleon Hill

I never read Napoleon Hill’s classic Think and Grow Rich. I judged the book by the cover believing that it was probably materialistic pablum only useful to sales people trying to develop positive thinking habits to consistently close deals and make big bucks – not that there’s anything wrong with that. Being successful in sales does require a strong dose of integrity, self-confidence and positive thinking, but I didn’t see the relevance to someone like me who was an educator and not motivated by wealth accumulation. I made a mistake.

The two quotes above sound like words you would see on inspirational posters that have no practical effect in the life of the individual who glances at them. The mind responds positively to such thoughts until…

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The case for Romantic Realism, and…

…other bedtime stories.  This is in actuality not a formal “case-making” post.  However I do feel I have a thought or two which I would like to air. Not so much regarding poetry, as regarding writing and sensuality in general.

First, I shall add the quote of the original post  here: Continue reading

I thought up another: form of rhymescheme notation, and alternate of sonnet form….

The following is paraphrased as well as copy/pasted from the entry in question–see the link below for the original (which, by this time, may well have been lucased)

I came upon an old, unpolished work of mine. Not exactly in this form, but in tetrameter Originally there were 4 quatrains. The original rhymescheme was AAxA, BBxB, etc. where ‘x’ is non rhyming. I thought one could sonnetize that by Turning the non-rhyming ‘x’ into a rhyme that carries through. This was an interesting result:

At last, the dawn, in perfect form, I see
So formed, a positive reality.
It’s purple state, in perfect choir, unveil
To shine, inspiringly, its song on me.

With form, and measure never void, it brings
A subtle mastery of the world it sings.
Without abash, I hear it tell a tale
Of majesty, and many more such things

Which burn with glory’s power, as they shine
Upon this shadow dappled world of mine.
My dreams are splendour, as they dance–prevail
With measure, and with form, and perfect line!

And dance I shall, as light–as mirrors bright
Reflect–avail, ’til dark, ’til death, ’til night!

Once again, you see the compressed rhyme scheme in the ending couplet.  I may post the original at some point; and I may post the altered sixteen line version, which is in iambic pentameter.

Also, on that note, I am beginning to think that, in order to more clearly describe rhymeschemes, one might perhaps use letters and numbers, or perhaps, upper and lower case letters, for different types of rhymes. And perhaps, ‘x’ might indicate lines that do not rhyme?

As an example, to describe the above, one could do the following:

AA1A, BB1B, etc. Or perhaps 11A1, 22A2, etc. Thus, one draws a distinction between the two types of rhymes–-as “ephemeral,” or immortal, or perhaps even better called, “perpetual.”

As such, one can clearly see delineated such rhymes which only last a short time, with those which carry through an entire piece, or, as may be the case, a larger part of a much larger piece.

It makes more sense to me when I look at it. What one usually sees would be AABA, CCBA, etc, but where “A” feels like a “first rhyme” “C” really feels like a “second” (or a B) but, in this kind of numbering, “C” generally means “3″ which makes the notation confusing, and one has to think about it a bit more, to decipher.

And as I think of it more, I think the appropriate version of the above would be:

AA1A, BB1B, etc.

This is because, while it is highly unlikely that there would be a large number of ephemeral rhymes, or at least those for which the alphabet could not be recycled, there could potentially be–in a very long piece–any number of perpetual rhymes.  And using the lowercase ‘x’ makes sense for non rhyming lines as well.

And a compressed scheme (or lines with internal rhymes such as the final couplet here could be in brackets of some kind.  For this, I have generally been using square brackets. This would give the above sonnet as:

AA1A,  BB1B,  CC1C,  [DD][1D]

via Sonnet: | David Emeron: Sonnets.

So it occurs to me that…

…this entry (spaces removed):

as i slept
by a veranda
open to the sea
on a cool night
just right
to let

the wind
and moonlight
and the stars
blow quietly
past me
as i slept

… is rather a sonnet of sorts if two (acutally quite releveant) lines are added to each verse:

as i slept
just inside
by a veranda
open to the sea
on a cool night
just right
to let

the wind
and moonlight
and the stars
blow quietly
past me
caressing
as i slept

Shakespeare is Dead

Oh kind Sir! Bravo!!! This shall be my first reblog in a long little while! Again, I say: “Bravo!!!!!!!!!!!11111one!

0over0

The professor was a strange man; indeed, there is little else about him upon which it can be agreed.  We might hesitate to submit that he was strange in any conventional sense—it wasn’t that his voice was too high or his stature too short or anything of the like—no, it was rather something peculiarly unrelated to any identifiable quality of himself. He was strange in a strange sense. Though upon it, it most certainly may not be agreed, this author might be so bold as to assign him the label of pedantic; for he was dreadfully preoccupied with the ‘rules of proper English’ and had an unchecked phobia of sentences that ended in prepositions bordering on the psychotic, which caused him to go to great lengths to avoid such sentences, and in turn, to produce such clausal absurdities as ‘upon which it can be agreed’ and ‘upon it, it…

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