How to Teach Writing Sonnets | Wanderings in the Labyrinth

Although I am indeed able to write a sonnet in far less than 15 minutes, (I have written six months worth of these at least one per day, and) I find that typically I spend several hours on each one; although this may include research or additional constraints on the form. I could add a few more weapons to the arsenal of method, so to speak, that… Continue reading

I think I really must merge all my blogs into one.

I say this because of the follow I received from the reference below.  And… because I feel it might make more sense in a logical and procedural way.

Considering the nature of my own site, this offering was most enjoyed. Although… I confess I feel most able to express myself in the strictest of forms such that I do not mind at all burdening such a form with additional constraints. You must judge for yourself if my words are elucidative or obfuscatory.

A word, then two, a fountain like a stream…

This is #5 in a sequence of seven (so far) oddly germane to this post of yours, which I very much enjoyed.
#6 of the same sequence features even more constraints as well as a generous helping of metaphor (given that my background is in the hard sciences) to which perusal of the entire sequence might offer some small illumination.

Of these seven, five are, as is the one above, in the (English version of the) Italian style, #4, as is yours above, in the Shakespearean style, and the one I mention, #6, is in a form which I call “reverse Spenserian,” a form of my own devising–although I may well not be the first to invent such a form. In any case, I have found that most sonnet forms reverse well, although in some cases, one needs to expand ones definition of reversal for such a thing to work.

via How Do You Sonnet? | The Poetry Question.

Eureka!

I think I finally managed to ferret out the form for postID as a REAL permalink  that will continue to work no matter what happens to the post or where it may be moved.

upon further examination…

It appears that

http://<domain>?p=PostIdNum

will in fact work. I must have been typing something incorrectly in my experiments. It took me a bit of redundant mucking about to discover this fact. The default behaviour of an independent wordpress site is a bit different, and I admit that when compared to my dearest one I am notoriously poor at doing research; unless it is the real kind wherein one actually does ones own discovery and experiments–which is what, in fact, I resorted to in this as well.

One can even add

&preview=true

to the end and use the same link before it is posted (and which will do no harm once the entry is live) making it

http://<domain>?p=<PostIdNum>&preview=true

In addition, one can add a bookmark in the form

#comment-<CommentIdNum>

with the dash instead of the equal sign followed by the PostId number, or any other bookmark

#<BookMarkId>

which exists or is allowed in the post, making it

http://<domain>?p=PostIdNum&preview=true#comment-CommentIdNum

This will… may… save me some effort although it is not all that difficult to create the unique tags I have been using. it tends though to bog down the whole process though. I wish the links would stick around after the draft is saved.

I am now investigating links of the same kind to pages. although this is not so important… and I have just now discovered that indeed this very same form works for pages. And in the case of wordpress blogs integrated with domain names, the method works as well. One can use both ones registered domain and the original wordpress blog name. Both will work. Hmm. Well, give me good old fashioned scientific method any old day.

The fact is that once one clicks “save” (verses the auto-save that happens automatically in the beginning) one must then construct the link oneself (from, for example, by editing the “Get Shortlink” link, or by copying the “Preview” link before one makes the post live.)  Evidently once one changes or alter the status of the publishing date wherein it no longer reads “Publish immediately” this link will no longer be listed and will instead be replaced by the default “permalink” which contains a directory structure involving the date of publication.

This post, for example can be accessed by using the following:

Try them for yourself!  I have tested them both logged in and logged out and they seem to function properly on the handful of machines I have surrounding me.

The downside of all this is that there appears to be no way for a non blog member to discern the PostIdNum.  It can only be seen in the dashboard area before one saves for the first time.  After that it can be unmangled from the “edit” links, but only if one is able to access these, therefore if one wants people to use these links, they must be provided in some way.  Which means that I should probably create some templates for this.

The Viking Situation:

Herein I attempt to link all the relevant posts wherever they may be:

  1. First: the location of the original exchange:  February 7th, 2013 at 4:03 am
  2. Next, the whole enchilada:  My first…
  3. Next, the introduction which you (kanzensakura) stumbled upon:  Where is Waldo?
  4. And the sonnet I wrote inspired by the whole exchange:  Sonnet:
  5. Finally, a note about the piece–titled referent to my research on the subject:   FYI

Now, after and, I think during the hole affair, there were even some very peculiar emails exchanged.  They seemed to appear in great heaps.  Those, however, I did not save, and had I saved them, I would not publish them here for ethical reasons–even if I chose to redact the identity of the author of these.

Related articles (only the first two are actually related, heh)

The Big Merge…

…seemed to go off without a hitch.  My final step this evening has been to remove all the post from “reflections.”  I did have to modify a few elements.  Some menu items were duplicated, as were all three blogs made to look similar.  It appears that I could very well merge all three into one.  The same effect as before could well be accomplished with one blog and three distinct categories.  I believe I more fully understand the issue of “tags” vs. “categories” and would now have little trouble using both to accomplish this.
Continue reading

Some thoughts about Mary and Martha. | kanzensakura

I feel I have of late had a bit of trouble extending my hand lately. Perhaps fearing the feel of things. Perhaps it has been this strange hiatus which is to blame. But I think not.

In any case, I very much enjoyed your thoughts regarding Mary and Martha. This is the stuff of which a good sermon is made. I think perhaps I have written less lately because of this. I must think about it more. The fact is, I have written so many sonnets that I know–almost like a professional writer knows, although I am most certainly not that–I can write one on demand at any time, and no matter how I feel.

I suppose I thought I’d push through, as it were, and write a (for me) short note to you here. In any case, your sermon notes upon Martha and Mary have given me something to think about.

On a lighter note. I do not remember ever having read a bible with such modern English. I prefer the KJV, (of course) and (also of course) have no trouble with its language! (which I am quite sure is fairly obvious by the work I have posted : )

When I was a bit younger, there was published a thing called “The Living Bible.” This was and is a paraphrased version of the Bible in modern English (of the 1970ies.) One tends, I think to regard more modernised version of the Bible as being similar to this version.

The trouble with paraphrased versions of the Bible is that they were heavily dependent on the understanding of the individual doing the paraphrasing. This meant that there were shades of meaning that were very difficult to divine whether, as some Christians might put it, ones reading was spirit-led or not.

However, an aspect of most modern Bibles, about which the majority of people are unaware, is that they are all more faithfully translated now regardless of the type of language they employ. This is due in part to more and older texts being unearthed and translated and made readily available.

Still… even though undeniably more accurate now–as are virtually all modern versions–Bibles in modern English are one new trick with which this old dog has a bit of trouble.

As ever, please do cast my missing or illegal grammar to the swine; no doubt it could well be named Legion, for they are many.

via Who Is Kanzen Sakura? | kanzensakura.
and Radical Hospitality of Jesus | lamzemsalira

And this is the moment wherein I click all the random, most likely not related links below:

Sonnet: Stardate – 50419.1…

My love has wings–slender, feathered things–
With grace in upswept curve and tapered tip,
My love would soar–swiftly to adore–
So twisting ever toward, and graceful skip.

So dances she–round and round to be–
Enrapt to bring us care, to bind us kept,
My love should know–you, my love, bestow–
Your Own, as did He dance and graceful stepped.

For now as wed… They–Our Love has said–
Would bear us swiftly hence as spectral ships;
So lovely They–So lighted, Their display–
That would illuminate our Earthly trips.

And lovely see–you and I–as We…
Take flight, as when I tasted first your lips.

  • once more for Gene.

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